Oracle Identity Manager (OIM) 11g install for Beginners (in the Cloud baby)!

This is a supplement to the post Setting up Oracle Identity and Access Management Suite (11g) in the Cloud: A few things that work & don’t work detailing a basic install and the little errors that prevented it from running that were encountered when someone new to Oracle Identity Manager (11g) installed it in a Cloud environment.

***NOTE: As with all Tips and Tricks we provide on the IDMWorks blog, use the following AT YOUR OWN RISK.  We do not guarantee this will work in your environment and make no warranties***

This is  a supplement to the post Setting up Oracle Identity and Access Management Suite (11g) in the Cloud: A few things that work & don’t work detailing  a basic install and the little errors that prevented it from running that were encountered when someone new to Oracle Identity Manager (11g) installed it in a Cloud environment.

To install OIM you have to go through several steps before you even start installing it.  Now I’m sure that most folks reading this have pre-existing environments that allow you to skip many of the following steps but let’s assume you are doing this from a brand spankin’ new MS Windows server.

Basically, you want to do the install first, and then the configuration.

1) You need to have the Java Development Kit (JDK) installed. Now you might think that just having it installed is good enough however the default installation path will put it in the ‘Program Files‘ folder.  Most MS Windows systems don’t have any particular preference however, your IDM install doesn’t like spaces in the file paths So be sure you have it installed in  a folder without spaces.

2) Be certain you are utilizing a static IP address. If you don’t, I would suggest reviewing the suggested fixes in the Setting up Oracle Identity and Access Management Suite (11g) in the Cloud: A few things that work & don’t work post.  Otherwise you will likely get a fair amount of errors when everything is up and running. The entire suite depends on having a static DNS name and IP address. When it doesn’t things fail without warning.

3) Now you should install the database. A few things to note here:

    • The database is where everything points to. Fortunately it’s not particularly hard to set up the software. Unfortunately the database itself has a few requirements. The  Setting up Oracle … in the Cloud post again covers the tricks needed to get this working properly but one thing I would add is that the default for the desktop install on the database has the wrong language code set. Don’t use it but do use “server” instead.

4) Once you have the database installed you have to run RCU.  Unfortunately RCU is a 32 bit program that is very picky about 64 bit operating systems. When installed in conjunction with a 64 bit database and then attempting to link the 32 bit RCU it would work until it attempted to add the OIM tables in.  Then it broke. The only fix I found was to use a 32 bit database. The RCU is just putting tables for the systems you are installing next to run off of, so we can assume it’s fully possible to drop the tables in manually, but I wouldn’t want to do it.

5) Assuming you finished the last few steps you can go onto the actual install of the programs. WebLogic first. If you are using the generic JAR installer, which you probably should be, you have to use your Java install to unpack it.  Now there is something you should take note of when you install WebLogic. There is a screen where it’s looking for Java packages. The generic JAR doesn’t have these with it. Again it is very picky about what folder it has selected to do the Java install with. It’s not so picky about whether or not the folder is occupied. Make sure it’s pointing to the right place. If all else fails, copy the Java bin to the area the installer wants. If you don’t things will install fine but never run (note: be sure to have the correct version installed as the systems are very specific about what they are compatible with).

6) Alrighty then, WebLogic is installed. Web/logic is the heart of everything else OIM related. With OIM installed you also need SOA. You have to install the .2 version and then upgrade to the .3 version. Typically this is a pretty straight forward install.

7) NOW we can install OIM. The OIM install itself is pretty easy again but it is the next few steps that can mess you up. Make sure you don’t start up the Configuration Manager quite yet.

8 ) Now we configure Weblogic. You are looking for a file called config.sh in a folder called common. It’s in the directory you installed all the stuff you have already installed. Now when you bring it up, you want to select the programs you want Weblogic to support. Then you have to connect to the database you have running still.  If you can’t connect make sure your password is right. If you still can’t connect then your database isn’t liking something.

9 ) Since you have WebLogic configured you now have to configure OIM.  It’s pretty straightforward. You point it at the WebLogic address that you setup and the program will register yourself. One thing you should look out for is the line OIM HTTP URL. This line should have your WebLogic connection address with a different port. In my silliness installing this once I had it as the same port, it allowed WebLogic to run, and OIM started up just fine, but after a moment OIM alone would stop, as well as the soa-infra server.

10) Start everything up!

Questions? Feel free to reach out to us at IDMWorks.