Oracle Identity Manager, Oracle Linux 5, & VMWare

As someone who has spent the majority of my computing time in a Microsoft Windows world but familiar with Linux I didn’t think twice when attempting to setup an Oracle Identity Manager environment based on Linux. A few obstacles later I learned some very important lessons for installing OIM on Linux.**NOTE: As with all Tips and Tricks we provide on the IDMWorks blog, use the following AT YOUR OWN RISK.  We do not guarantee this will work in your environment and make no warranties***

As someone who has spent the majority of my computing time in a Microsoft Windows world but familiar with Linux I didn’t think twice when attempting to setup an Oracle Identity Manager environment based on Linux. A few obstacles later I learned some very important lessons for installing OIM on Linux.

    • First, it is important to know the “root” user password but to also have another account available with permission to access installation data. Some processes requires “root” user access while others strictly prohibit “root” user from executing them. For the most part you will not be using “root” user for the installs but there are some scripts used in the installation processes that require “root” user to execute making knowledge of both accounts a must.
    • Always understand the prerequisites! Oracle Identity Manager requires other applications like Oracle Database, Web Logic, etc. Each of these applications have their own prerequisites like versions of Java JDK, Java_Home variables declared in the .bash_profile, and certain Linux packages be installed. If these prerequisites aren’t met it can result in errors during installation, stalled installations, and even graphical distortions with the install wizards. This means that before attempting to install the OIM components it is very worthwhile to double check all of the prerequisites prior to installation to make your life easier.
    • Another useful tip is to “know your installer”. Many of the OIM component downloads contain installers for multiple platforms and some generic installers that are platform independent. Knowing which install to use for the desired platform is important. Some of the generic installers do not have some components bundled in the installer that are required. A perfect example is the Web Logic Server installer. Web Logic requires a JDK selection during the install process.  While the OS specific installs come bundled with compatible JDK’s the generic install does not include any JDK so one will have to be installed separately and manually specified.  Which installer to use is determined by the compatibility matrix on Oracle’s website.  And I can tell you for sure that it will save you time and frustration to look at that before starting your installs.
    • For VM installs you may run into an issue that upon install the max resolution is 800 x 600.  This becomes a small issue since the Oracle Database 11g installer wants a 1024 x 768 resolution so the full menu won’t appear on the screen.  This is actually a pretty easy fix.  In the display properties change the hard to an LCD with the desired resolution.  Once that is set you can go back to the resolution selection screen and change to a higher resolution.  A reboot will be required before the new resolution can take effect though.
    • And probably the most useful thing to know is the Linux commands that will be used throughout these installs.  Below is a list of some of the commands that were used:
  1. su:  This command lets you assume superuser or “root” user level access, provided that you know the password for that account.
  2. exit: When you are finished with “root” user access this command will exit the root user session and return the terminal permissions back to the logged in user.
  3. java -version: This will print out what version of java is installed and registered in the environment variables located in the .bash_profile.
  4. whereis java: This will print out the different locations that java is installed based on the environment variables and any linked symbols.
  5. vi ~/.bash_profile:
    • This command will allow you to edit the .bash_profile where environment variables are declared.
    • This file should only be edited under instruction because if this file is fouled up it can trash the system and require a complete reinstall.
    • : wq: When editing the .bash_profile file this command will allow you save the changes and then exit back to the terminal.  Of course there are other commands that can be used to accomplish the thing.
    • . ./.bash_profile: After editing the .bash_profile this will reload the settings using the updated file.
    • rpm -ivh <filename>: This will install packages that may be missing.  This does require an exact file name to be specified.

 

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