Cyberthreat: Sony gets Hit (yet again) and User Data gets Posted (yet again)

Someone seems to be really, really, really angry with Sony. This time the hack grabbed and published @ 1 million customers names, passwords, email addresses, phone numbers, home addresses and even birthdays. Youch! As for the message in all of this, one can only sit and wonder, in this age of of the growing federations between us, the consumer, and the multitude of services we subscribe to, including, but not limited to, online banking, online bill payment, online shopping, online entertainment, and online social networking, how long it will take before all of our information becomes public knowledge. And in this I don’t mean our names and addresses but our credit cards and financial data, passwords and complete online history. As of now, it pretty much is happening already but we really haven’t seen anything yet as the information being acquired has only scratched the surface in the damage it can really cause all of us.

Someone seems to be really, really, really angry with Sony.  This time the hack grabbed and published @ 1 million customer names, passwords, email addresses, phone numbers, home addresses and even birthdays.  Youch!

There was the big PlayStation Network hit that took over 77 million accounts and shut down the PSN network that is still struggling to come back to full capacity.  A second attack occurred on it’s Sony Online Entertainment network that took down 25 million more accounts.  Sony Music Greece was next with 8300 users’ info grabbed and posted e-mails, phone numbers, and passwords.  Then came Sony Music Entertainment Japan with another 8000 posted e-mails, phone numbers, and passwords.

Why Sony came into the cross hairs of  the black hat hacking community is anyone’s guess but for whatever reason they did.  Hopefully Sony is opening up the wallet to ensure this does not happen in the future (which in the short term is an inevitability, but perhaps in the long term it can be averted).

At a minimum PBS, Google and a host of other firms that were recently hacked are probably happy that the ongoing Sony salvos are taking the media heat somewhat off of their shoulders.

As for the message in all of this, one can only sit and wonder, in this age of of the growing federations between us, the consumer, and the multitude of services we subscribe to, including, but not limited to, online banking, online bill payment, online shopping, online entertainment, and online social networking, how long it will take before all of our information becomes public knowledge.  And in this I don’t mean our names and addresses but our credit cards and financial data, passwords and complete online history.  As of now, it pretty much is happening already but we really haven’t seen anything yet as the information being acquired has only scratched the surface in the damage it can really cause all of us.

Hopefully the IT Security World can keep up, for as of now, it is falling behind.